Interest In SQL Server Seems To Be Declining?

12 thoughts on “Interest In SQL Server Seems To Be Declining?

  1. Your post may be in jest, in which case ignore my question: What unit of interest are you measuring and how are you measuring it?

    Like

  2. What data is this based on?
    What do these letters on the curve mean?
    What does the ‘News headlines’ checkbox mean?
    What do you mean by ‘missing 2005’?

    Like

  3. I think that statistics is not reflecting the whole picture, yes, it could be a decreasing number of searches on “SQL Server” term on all the search engines, however, there is one reason to consider on that number, and its that now you actually search for different terms that refers to SQL Server, I presonally do that, it is, in the past you searched for sql functions, syntax, built-in stored procedures, etc. and now, besides those kind of searches, you also search for tems like MDX, SSAS, SSIS, SSRS, DMX, etc., so, if you can define a list of indirect terms that refers to the “SQL Server” product and analyze the interest result for all of those terms and put them togheter, you’ll get a more close result/answer for your question.

    Like

  4. I realize that Microsoft is in a downward trend but so is everybody else due to a bad economy and 9 million people not working (and buying).

    So, this downward trend is expected. Maybe you should do a chart of the I.T./Database/Developers now out of work or working in jobs at 50 percent of what they made pre-2009… Then, do a chart of the number of oversees jobs. I think you will see something very interesting there, my friend.

    Microsoft kept us working for years because they had good products but now, when times are tough, we nite the hand that once fed us….

    Like

  5. This is really interesting – I never thought to look at Google trends for this information. i have been trying to collect data on how many installs of SQL-Server are up and running around the world (estimates only of course) – with some sort of breakdown like whether they are in SME’s, large enterprises etc… but I am finding it very very hard. I did a similar exercise 8 years ago – and it was much easier – it was readily available and published. I wonder if the two observations are in some way related.

    Like

  6. Is there a similar trendline showing how many searches have been performed with SQL Server as a keyword? Even though SQL Server might not be in as many headlines, I think the SQL Server community is stronger than ever so I would bet that searches related to SQL Server are just as high if not higher than they were in 2005. 2005 was a huge leap forward for SQL Server as a product and in recent years many of their product updates have not been as dramatic.I would also be curious to see this same graph for other RDBMS.

    Like

  7. It was a tongue in cheek post based on real results from Google, a warning about making conclusions based on a visualization without knowing or understanding the type and accuracy of the underlying data. The funny thing is it “could” be true. I could imagine a big big spike around the SQL 2005 release, it had been a long time and had a lot of changes. Yet I’d expect to see a spike around 2008 and 2012 releases (and maybe it did, just not much?). My reference to missing 2005 was a ‘missing the good old days’ reference.

    My hunch, based on perhaps a skewed view, is that the amount of content and discussion about SQL Server remains at least as good as five years ago and I’d guess somewhat higher mainly due to the number of SQLSaturday’s we’ve had.

    Like

    1. Again, you fail to note the economic downturn that happened in late 2008 and continues today. MANY businesses went out of business and laid off people. Many business laid off U.S.-based people and hired offshore people and are allowing those people to make technology decisions, despite their lack of experience. The companies that are left are crunching their budgets (staying with older versions or delaying upgrades)… So, this downward trend is normal, given the economic picture.

      Like

  8. Interesting. So I thought I would see what the Google Trends look like for SSRS and SSIS as separate search terms. SSRS has a strong upward trend. Adding SSIS added much bigger peaks for SSIS around 2007-2009. So far, so good. Then I added the search term “SQL server” as the third trend. LOL! (I wanted to send you the screen shots, but could not see a way to do it.)
    Thanks for a fun diversion. šŸ™‚

    Like

  9. That’s because you don’t have to search for SQL Server to find SQL Server answers; prefacing your searches with SQL almost guarantees you’ll get MSDN or another SQL Server-centric site first. It’s when you’re searching for other dB flavor solutions that you have to specify MySQL or PostgreSQL or whatever in your searches. This include generic syntax searches.

    Like

Comments are closed.